Shutter for Linux Screenshot

June 01, 2020 — Jt Spratley

First published on March 21, 2016

For Linux distros, XFCE4-Screenshooter (or Screenshot) seems to be the norm based off the few distros I’ve used. It does what the average user would need it to do – in the GUI or CLI.


Capture all screens

Capture the last window you used

Capture a rectangular region (Think Windows Snipping Tool)

Screenshot_Start

However, after you take the screenshot, your options are either to save, copy to your clipboard, open it elsewhere, or upload it.

Screenshot_After

Shutter_Logo_Written_out

If you’re okay with that, good for you. But if you’d like MORE in a screenshot app, such as compare multiple screenshots, edit post-capture, and add effects, you might want to check out Shutter (now Flameshot). Take a glance.

Shutter_Screenshot

The menu bar has standard options for a photo editor – save to 20 different formats (including PDF), zoom, and e-mail. There are also plugins for adding special effects (i.e. custom watermark and shadow). The “Export” option allows for quick uploading to a FTP server or public hosting account.

Shutter_Toolbar

To get to the editor, you have to click the “edit” option, via pressing the icon in the upper-right corner or selecting “edit” from the “Screenshot” or right-click menu. The available options are to draw lines and shapes, add text, blur or pixelize areas, add censor circles, and crop. For anything more, I simply transfer the file by selecting “Screenshot,” “Open With,” and usually Pinta.

Shutter_Editor_Function

It’s not always about what’s better. Sometimes, it’s just about preference and knowing your options.

Tags: IT, linux, software, open-source